Tag Archives: Food

Beechtree Lantern Walk 2017

“Through our collective action we can light up the darkness in the world”

Tonight we celebrated Martinmas by holding our annual Lantern Walk at our former stomping grounds of Meanwood Park. The children all made lanterns with Autumn leaf designs, Class One creating beautiful leaf silhouettes and Kindergarten children using a leaf rubbing technique.

The way to the meeting point in the park was lit with little glass lanterns. Once the children had collected their lanterns, we began the walk through the woods.

As we walked, we sang:

“I go with my little lantern, my lantern is going with me,
In heaven the stars are shining, on earth shines my lantern with me,
My little light, it shines so bright, please help me to find my way in the night,
My little light, it shines so bright, please help me to find my way”

Then walked in reverent silence, enjoying the Autumn evening and watching the lantern lights dance through the trees.

After the walk, the children offered round some simple biscuits they had all made to share  and enjoyed some hot fruit tea before we said our goodbyes.

Steiner festivals are a continuation of a tradition of communal celebration which people all over the world have engaged with throughout history; a chance to share genuine human experiences, such as hopes for a new year, joy at springtime or thanks for the life-giving power of the sun, for example.

One may use the analogy that if the year were a necklace then the festivals are like the jewels which adorn it; little highlights which have their own characteristic beauty which allow us to look forward to something and work towards it together.

One of the fundamental aspects of Steiner Waldorf education is that physical growth and development is the main focus for children under seven. Hence we allow them to learn “bodily” through play, imitation, movement games and undertaking craft and domestic activities. We consciously avoid awakening the intellect through factual or scientific explanations, but try to use stories and pictorial imagery which is more appropriate for the children at this stage. As such a festival can allow children to experience the community coming together to celebrate, acting socially, and often with reverence.

Friday is spelled “P-I-Z-Z-A”

Friday has long been talked about by the children in the Kindy because it is inextricably linked with pizza.

And as everyone knows, pizza is just about the best thing in the world.

Come to think of it, my personal favorite is a thin crust pizza made in Malta; on the island of Gozo to be exact, that is topped with sliced potato, goat’s cheese, onion, and sausage. It’s just about the best pie I’ve ever eaten and constantly resurfaces in my daydreams.

But I digress.

Coming back to the topic at hand, two Fridays ago (apologies for the sluggishness, I had a sick household and a trip south that congested my writing regimen…) was my first Friday in the Kindy and not unlike the children I found myself looking forward to pizza for lunch. I was looking forward to it so much that the morning kind of drifted by in a doughy, yeasty haze.

Mid morning: the sun was streaming through the windows, children were creatively constructing and deconstructing imagined lives in every corner of the room, and with the pizza baking in the oven sending the mixed tendrils of rye bread and melting cheddar and a hint of tomato into the air….  I must admit, it was especially hard to stay focused. But we all kept it together and made the hike down to Meanwood Park- picking blackberries the whole way.

It had been a long, salivating sort of day, and an excruciatingly long hike for some of the smaller ones, but once inside the park we made ourselves at home, laying a few blankets on the damp ground. Some of us kicked off our Wellies and Ziggy handed out a pizza so tasty that it rivaled the best of the world.

The Art of Cooking

Jaime Oliver’s got nothing on me.

I admit that he’s good, and there’s nothing quite like snuggling up with my wife after a long week and indulging in one of his instructional Youtube videos from his younger years, but I think I’m the better chef because really, when’s the last time he had to share his kitchen with twenty or thirty children?

I am the soup chef this school year. Every Tuesday I chop, mix, and blend a soup for the Kindergarten. The ingredients vary slightly from week to week, but usually  the soup consists of butternut squash, carrots, potatoes, sweet potato, cauliflower, leeks, and lentils. As the children are arriving in the morning, I begin with a vegetable stock, and then with the help of the children, we chop up the veggies. In sensible fashion, we toss in the dense butternut first, followed by the potatoes, carrots, leeks, and just before blending it, finish up with the lentils. My secret touch involves going outside to the garden and cut a few leaves of sage as well as some thyme. I feel this brings a delicate touch of sophistication to the meal, a touch that the children need for their culinary development. Together with freshly baked bread and a finishing course of freshly chopped fruit, we all leave the table happy and satisfied.

Last Tuesday I started prepping the afternoon snack. It consisted of halved Beechtree bread (one of these posts I intend to share the recipe) with an olive-based spread and pear and apple jam. One child became intrigued and wanted to help, so I asked that she wash her hands and select an apron to put on. Within minutes five children were lined up shoulder to shoulder smearing the olive spread, and then the jam on each of the pieces of bread. There was concentration, smiles, and jam everywhere, but I think I can say with conviction that the overarching feeling was unanimous in that it was the best snack ever!