Cultivating a Learner’s Mindset

This is not a scientific study by any means but I’ve been watching, my son especially, and I’ve noticed that he and the other students with whom I work at Beechtree, generally speaking,  do not differentiate among toys nor do they compartmentalize their play.

Blocks, blankets, dolls, pencils, and anything else within easy grab gets thrown into the mix of the children’s play. A gender neutral doll can easily become a girl, boy, or even an aardvark according to a student’s needs. The most innocent of looking of dolls have even been known to become a monster or acrobat. And accordingly, in this case, whole worlds grow up around a doll’s personality or characteristics.

At first I thought it was a Beechtree thing and part of the reason why I teach and why my son attends class. Then I noticed it at home. I had always noticed it, even encouraged it, but then one day it really snapped into me. My child will incorporate any toy, any kitchen tool, blanket, or piece of furniture into his play. I haven’t asked my mother to confirm, but I do not ever recall mixing toys with such ease. Little yellow-headed figures and their accompanying pirate ships would only play with other pirates. Yellow-headed pirates would not mix with yellow-headed city folk and they definitely wouldn’t mix with intergalactic star figures. I had justifications. Different worlds and unrelated time periods did not mix.

It seems that this Steiner education model, with its emphasis on cooperative, imaginative, and creative play encourages a learner’s mindset. Our Head Teacher Ziggy is great at role modeling lateral thinking and flipped expectations: quite literally flipping a table upside down to become a rocket ship, rearranging chairs to become a bus, or reshaping a broom to become a robot arm. Ideas are embraced and incorporated rather than discarded or negated. Time and again I have witnessed this lateral thinking expressed in the children and their play. This play is in fact pretty awesome stuff if you think on how it might mature in the coming years. The children themselves are breaking down barriers both physically and psychologically, creating peace within themselves and in the world around them.