Monthly Archives: October 2017

Class One’s first half term at Beechtree Steiner

Written by Beechtree Steiner’s Class One teacher, Anthea Stock. 

The time with the lovely class 1 children at Beechtree Steiner in Chapeltown is flying by. I can’t believe it is October already and that half term is nearly here. The classroom looks beautiful with lazured walls, a fantastic new blackboard and some traditional wooden desks and chairs; a perfect place for serious fun whilst learning.

Here are a few snapshots to share with you all.

In Waldorf education, the letters of the alphabet are presented in a lively pictorial way, which appeal to the child’s imagination. “D” is a magical door in a tree through which two children crawl to find an old lady called Dorothea who tells fairy stories to them. From these stories letters are discovered. “B” is a big bellied brown bear from Snow White and Rose Red. The children draw the letter in the air with their hands and on the floor with their feet; their whole being participates in the writing experience. Then the children make their own pictures of the images with wax blocks and then write the actual letter. As you can see in the picture, “ G” is a golden goose. We also modeled the very funny procession from the story out of Alkena beeswax.

At this time of the year we think about being brave and courageous so we have been reciting poems, singing songs about St Michael and knights and fighting dragons. The children made thin swords out of branches, a fiery red dragon out of leaves and baked delicious dragon shaped bread. It is very important to educate using hands as well as hearts and heads.

Building a new Steiner school in Leeds

Written​ ​from​ ​the​ ​point​ ​of​ ​view​ ​of​ ​Kindergarten​ ​parent​ ​and​ ​Trustee​ ​Lianne​ ​Marie.

I am parent to a four year old boy who has attended Beechtree Steiner’s Outdoor
Parent & Child from the age of eighteen months and Snowdrops Kindergarten from
the age of three years. He has very severe dermal allergies and goes into
anaphylaxis when exposed to non-natural cleaning products, meaning that he could
not attend mainstream education or enter childcare anywhere except for a very
strictly controlled and safe environment. Discovering Beechtree Steiner has been so
important to our family. The love and support that we have experienced from the
other parents and the incredibly dedicated teaching staff have meant so much to us.
Beechtree Steiner is such a special place and we are very proud to be part of such a
warm, loving and inclusive community.
The first experience of the Beechtree Steiner community that my husband and I had
was stumbling across a sea of brightly coloured picnic blankets in Meanwood Park.
There were families of every conceivable ethnicity all talking and sharing food whilst
their gloriously muddy children played together. It was a beautiful sight to behold and
we could tell that there was something really significant about this group of people.
Our son got to playing with a little girl and a week later we found ourselves sat with
her parents under the shade of a giant Beech tree eating campfire flatbread made by
the children. Fast forward two years of attending Parent and Child group every week
and our children are now enrolled together in Kindergarten and we and our
wonderful friends are discussing what we are going to do now that our building is
due to be demolished and we have to try to recreate the same Beechtree magic in a
new location.
We all come together with ideas and spend the year raising funds by having coffee
mornings, nearly new sales, fayres, pay as you feel haircuts, a duck race, raffles,
applying to local businesses for funding and by completing Total Warrior; an obstacle
course race over a 12k track comprising of 100 tonnes of mud and thirty obstacles.

I’m quite sure that every parent is alike in being willing to do anything for their
children’s well-being, but this is a community of people willing to literally jump over
fire for them!
As the term ends, my husband leads the “dismantling team” who are responsible for
packing up the old premises in Headingley and moving it to the new location in
Chapeltown whilst I busy myself with the working group responsible for creating our
new home.
We have teams of parents responsible for prepping and painting the walls, teams of
parents responsible for sourcing new furniture, floor coverings and materials to
create the outdoor space and teams of skilled people to create new internal walls,
hang doors, do plumbing, electrics and build kitchens.

It is an absolutely mammoth task but it is encouraging to see everybody come
together to make it work – the people who are there on the ground painting or
building stud walls have incredible support from other parents who offer them
childcare or drop off supplies or fill the boot of their car with rubbish for the tip. Every
contribution, whether encouraging words on our Facebook group as the progress
pictures come in or somebody dropping off a pint of milk and a tin of home-made
biscuits for the tired and hungry workers is so appreciated. A person there at the
right time to just sweep and mop the floor makes just as much difference as
somebody who has been trained to lazure the walls in beautiful swirls of pale pink.
There is no better way to get to know a group of people than when you are building
something together. Skilled tradespeople rub up against enthusiastic helpers who
are eager to learn and organised people direct the right person to complete a
suitable task for their skills or find resources to solve problems. We all chat about our
children, sing along to eclectic playlists and make sure that we are all drinking
enough water and going home at some point to sleep and eat and see our families.
In the weeks before term starts, the staff return from their Summer break to unpack
the classrooms and figure out where the new and old furniture needs to go and the
reality of everything we have achieved together in such a short space of time is very
humbling. Seeing familiar things like the art supplies, natural wooden toys and
outdoor clothes all ready for the children to discover provokes a surprisingly
emotional response. As the lights are softened to a pink glow, fabrics are fireproofed
and safeguarding procedures are put in place, we head for the rapidly evolving
outdoor space to fill planters with topsoil and compost, plant bulbs and herbs and lay
bark chipping paths and fill the sand pit.
There’s an old adage that it takes a village to raise a child, it is certainly also true that
it takes a whole community to build a Steiner school.